Saltwater Taffy articulated streamer!

The Saltwater Taffy is an articulated streamer completely made of synthetic materials and is modeled and adapted from multiple articulated trout streamers and Striper patterns. I wanted a fly with a lot of movement, and with the translucency that a lot of saltwater flies are known for, so I present the Saltwater Taffy.
Ingredients:
1. Gamakatsu B10S stinger hook size 4 and 2,
2. 140-210 denier thread,
3. EP Brush Gamchange Blend,
4. EP Brush Foxy 1.5″ wide,
5. 6″- 8″ strong monofilament for loop, ( if you’re fishing for bluefish or pike,) skip the mono and make it wire,
6. E-Z Body Medium,
7. Egg Beads,

Start your thread midway on the stinger hook and wrap it toward the back.

Start your thread midway on the stinger hook and wrap it toward the back.

Tie on a four inch pinch of EP Gamechanger blend.

Tie on a four-inch pinch of EP Gamechange blend.

Fold the fibers that are facing forwards rearward making sure the fibers don't spin around the hook shank.

Fold the fibers that are facing forwards, rearward making sure the fibers don’t spin around the hook shank.

Tie on a full length of EP Brush Foxy, and start wrapping it forwards.

Tie on a full length of EP Brush Foxy, and wrap your thread to one eye length behind the hook eye, start wrapping the EP Foxy forwards.

Make sure to keep the fibers from getting trapped by brushing them backwards as you wrap.

Making sure to to keep the fibers from getting trapped by brushing them backwards as you wrap.

Finish wrapping the EP Bush Foxy, tie it off, and snip off the remainder. Whip finish the head and add head cement,

Finish wrapping the EP Bush Foxy, tie it off, and snip off the remainder. Whip finish the head and add head cement, put the stinger off to the side.

On the main hook create a thread base then tie on the monofilament adding ZAP GOO, to make it strong.

On the main hook create a thread base then tie on the monofilament, adding ZAP GOO to make it strong.

Thread onto the mono three egg beads.

Thread onto the mono three egg beads.

Now take your stinger, loop it on to the mono so the hook faces down, and thread the mono bake through the beads. Pull the mono until the stinger hook almost touches the beads. Then tie down the mono and snip the remainder.

Now take your stinger, loop it on to the mono so the hook faces down, and thread the mono back through the beads. Pull the mono until the stinger hook almost touches the beads. Then tie down the mono and snip the remainder off.

Tie on a six-inch pinch of EP Brush Gamechange Blend so that it is on all sides of the hook shank.

Tie on a six-inch pinch of EP Brush Gamechange Blend so that it is on all sides of the hook shank.

Tie in the remaking piece of EP Brush Foxy, wrap your thread halfway up the hook shank.

Tie on the remaining piece of EP Brush Foxy, wrap your thread halfway up the hook shank.

Wrap the EP Foxy to where the thread hand Gas then tie off.

Wrap the EP Foxy to where the thread hangs, then tie off.

Pull bake the EP Gamechager fibers bringing your thread in front of them creating a thread dam. Then put the EZ Body over the hook eye and tie it down, whip finish a head cement.

Pull bake the EP Gamechange fibers bringing your thread in front of them creating a thread dam. Then put the EZ Body over the hook eye and tie it down, whip finish, and head cement.

Push the EZ Body back so the end is behind the hook eye.

Push the EZ Body back, so the end is behind the hook eye.

Tie the end of the EZ Body down, whip finish, then very carefully us a cauterised tool to clean up around the head, be sure not to burn the thread.

Tie the end of the EZ Body down, whip finish, then very carefully us a cauterising tool to clean up around the head, be sure not to burn burn the thread.

Cover the EZ Body with SOFTEX, let it dry.

Cover the EZ Body with SOFTEX, let it dry.

Advertisements

5 freshwater fly patterns I’m never without, Ever!

I always carry one or all of the following flies with me when I go fly fishing.

#1. Bead head Hares-Ear nymph; This would have to be my go to panfish fly. A sunny day, my five weight, and a box of nymphs, sound like a great day at the lake. From a boat I go to the up wind side of a weed bed and drift over it dropping the HE into open pockets in the weeds. This technique is similar to Czech nymphing in that the fly is directly underneath the tip of the rod.

#2. Pink Flash Bugger;  I’m not sure this flies real name, but my mom discovered it when on the fly fishing trip to Errol, NH last fall. It is now one of our most successful fly patterns. My mom fishes this fly 90 percent of the time, and has caught smallmouth bass, brook trout, and fallfish. img_0170

#3. Goddard Caddis; To be perfectly honest I’ve never been a big fan of dry flies. They get waterlogged, they get chewed into indistinguishable mush after a few fish. Plus most of what a fish eats is under the water’s surface. So I didn’t really give fishing dry flies a second thought until I discovered the Goddard Caddis.The first time I fished the Goddard, I lost track of the number of sunfish and chubs I caught. I even got my first double, a pumpkinseed on the Goddard and a yellow perch on a midge dropper. I fish a brown Goddard as a searching pattern, but I also tie tan and pink patterns. It makes a great strike indicator/top fly.

#4. Matuka; The Matuka is one of those flies that can be tied in many variations and is fun to mess with. Add an articulated shank with some monstrosity tied on, or tie on a pair of dumbbell eyes giving the Matuka a nice jigging motion. I prefer to tie my Matukas in olive with a gold rib. Trolling them for smallmouth bass has worked great, and the trout seem to like them, but can’t get their mouth around the #2 hook I’ve been using!

#5. Sakasa Kebari; When I first got started fly fishing I used a Suntech Kurenai hm30 to swing Sakasa Kebari’s for brook trout and chubs on local streams. The Sakasa Kebari is a great fly for small infertile streams, where most of the food the fish is eating is free-floating in the current.

My Sharona,

Well brushing my dog I was able to get a lot of really nice fur perfect for dubbing so I went to my fly tying desk and tied up a small group of flies based on some grayling and euronymphing fly patterns and one of our local caddis flies, I’ve named it the fly “My Sharona”.
It is tied on a size # 16 umpqua nymph hook, using hot pink thread, white dog hair dubbed body, peacock herl collar, and an optional bead head.
image
Slide on beadhead, start the thread midshank and wrap backwards then wrap forward two eye lengths. Wrap on dubbing leaving a gap in between dubbing and beadhead. Tie in peacock herl and wrap a thick collar behind the beadhead, whip finish.
If you choose to tie it without beadhead fly will float then slowly sink.
I also tie a diving caddis version with a pheasant feather collar.

Sakasa kebari fly pattern,

This is my first fly tying post I’m still working on it the pictures are a little blurry.

Some good web sites to visit are:
http://www.tenkarabum.com
Flyanglersonline.com
http://www.tenkarausa.com

Ingredients:

1. Daiichi curved size 12 hook,
2. Red 70 Dener thread,
3. Peacock herl,
4. Pheasant feathers,
5. Head cement,

Start thread in middle of hook wrap to bend then wrap to two eye lengths from hooks eye,

Start thread in middle of hook wrap to bend then wrap to two eye lengths from hooks eye,


Tie in peacock herl,

Tie in peacock herl,


Wrap peacock herl around hook shank to create a thick collar,

Wrap peacock herl around hook shank to create a thick collar,


Make the tip of the pheasant feather so it looks like this,

Make the tip of the pheasant feather so it looks like this,


Ty in pheasant feather and wrap around hook shank so it the hackle faces forward,

Tie in pheasant feather and wrap around hook shank so it the hackle faces forward,


Whip finish and head cement,

Whip finish and head cement,

I present my fly to the fish by casting upstream and letting it drift through all the eddies, and riffles.