Saltwater Taffy articulated streamer!

The Saltwater Taffy is an articulated streamer completely made of synthetic materials and is modeled and adapted from multiple articulated trout streamers and Striper patterns. I wanted a fly with a lot of movement, and with the translucency that a lot of saltwater flies are known for, so I present the Saltwater Taffy.
Ingredients:
1. Gamakatsu B10S stinger hook size 4 and 2,
2. 140-210 denier thread,
3. EP Brush Gamchange Blend,
4. EP Brush Foxy 1.5″ wide,
5. 6″- 8″ strong monofilament for loop, ( if you’re fishing for bluefish or pike,) skip the mono and make it wire,
6. E-Z Body Medium,
7. Egg Beads,

Start your thread midway on the stinger hook and wrap it toward the back.

Start your thread midway on the stinger hook and wrap it toward the back.

Tie on a four inch pinch of EP Gamechanger blend.

Tie on a four-inch pinch of EP Gamechange blend.

Fold the fibers that are facing forwards rearward making sure the fibers don't spin around the hook shank.

Fold the fibers that are facing forwards, rearward making sure the fibers don’t spin around the hook shank.

Tie on a full length of EP Brush Foxy, and start wrapping it forwards.

Tie on a full length of EP Brush Foxy, and wrap your thread to one eye length behind the hook eye, start wrapping the EP Foxy forwards.

Make sure to keep the fibers from getting trapped by brushing them backwards as you wrap.

Making sure to to keep the fibers from getting trapped by brushing them backwards as you wrap.

Finish wrapping the EP Bush Foxy, tie it off, and snip off the remainder. Whip finish the head and add head cement,

Finish wrapping the EP Bush Foxy, tie it off, and snip off the remainder. Whip finish the head and add head cement, put the stinger off to the side.

On the main hook create a thread base then tie on the monofilament adding ZAP GOO, to make it strong.

On the main hook create a thread base then tie on the monofilament, adding ZAP GOO to make it strong.

Thread onto the mono three egg beads.

Thread onto the mono three egg beads.

Now take your stinger, loop it on to the mono so the hook faces down, and thread the mono bake through the beads. Pull the mono until the stinger hook almost touches the beads. Then tie down the mono and snip the remainder.

Now take your stinger, loop it on to the mono so the hook faces down, and thread the mono back through the beads. Pull the mono until the stinger hook almost touches the beads. Then tie down the mono and snip the remainder off.

Tie on a six-inch pinch of EP Brush Gamechange Blend so that it is on all sides of the hook shank.

Tie on a six-inch pinch of EP Brush Gamechange Blend so that it is on all sides of the hook shank.

Tie in the remaking piece of EP Brush Foxy, wrap your thread halfway up the hook shank.

Tie on the remaining piece of EP Brush Foxy, wrap your thread halfway up the hook shank.

Wrap the EP Foxy to where the thread hand Gas then tie off.

Wrap the EP Foxy to where the thread hangs, then tie off.

Pull bake the EP Gamechager fibers bringing your thread in front of them creating a thread dam. Then put the EZ Body over the hook eye and tie it down, whip finish a head cement.

Pull bake the EP Gamechange fibers bringing your thread in front of them creating a thread dam. Then put the EZ Body over the hook eye and tie it down, whip finish, and head cement.

Push the EZ Body back so the end is behind the hook eye.

Push the EZ Body back, so the end is behind the hook eye.

Tie the end of the EZ Body down, whip finish, then very carefully us a cauterised tool to clean up around the head, be sure not to burn the thread.

Tie the end of the EZ Body down, whip finish, then very carefully us a cauterising tool to clean up around the head, be sure not to burn burn the thread.

Cover the EZ Body with SOFTEX, let it dry.

Cover the EZ Body with SOFTEX, let it dry.

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5 freshwater fly patterns I’m never without, Ever!

I always carry one or all of the following flies with me when I go fly fishing.

#1. Bead head Hares-Ear nymph; This would have to be my go to panfish fly. A sunny day, my five weight, and a box of nymphs, sound like a great day at the lake. From a boat I go to the up wind side of a weed bed and drift over it dropping the HE into open pockets in the weeds. This technique is similar to Czech nymphing in that the fly is directly underneath the tip of the rod.

#2. Pink Flash Bugger;  I’m not sure this flies real name, but my mom discovered it when on the fly fishing trip to Errol, NH last fall. It is now one of our most successful fly patterns. My mom fishes this fly 90 percent of the time, and has caught smallmouth bass, brook trout, and fallfish. img_0170

#3. Goddard Caddis; To be perfectly honest I’ve never been a big fan of dry flies. They get waterlogged, they get chewed into indistinguishable mush after a few fish. Plus most of what a fish eats is under the water’s surface. So I didn’t really give fishing dry flies a second thought until I discovered the Goddard Caddis.The first time I fished the Goddard, I lost track of the number of sunfish and chubs I caught. I even got my first double, a pumpkinseed on the Goddard and a yellow perch on a midge dropper. I fish a brown Goddard as a searching pattern, but I also tie tan and pink patterns. It makes a great strike indicator/top fly.

#4. Matuka; The Matuka is one of those flies that can be tied in many variations and is fun to mess with. Add an articulated shank with some monstrosity tied on, or tie on a pair of dumbbell eyes giving the Matuka a nice jigging motion. I prefer to tie my Matukas in olive with a gold rib. Trolling them for smallmouth bass has worked great, and the trout seem to like them, but can’t get their mouth around the #2 hook I’ve been using!

#5. Sakasa Kebari; When I first got started fly fishing I used a Suntech Kurenai hm30 to swing Sakasa Kebari’s for brook trout and chubs on local streams. The Sakasa Kebari is a great fly for small infertile streams, where most of the food the fish is eating is free-floating in the current.

Columbus Day on the fly,

For Columbus Day I went on my first fly fishing trip. My mom had the weekend off and my dad flew in the night before. The next day we headed north past the White Mountains, to the mighty Androscoggin River of northern New Hampshire.
The northern part of New Hampshire is absolutely gorgeous with large hills, cold rivers and vast forests. We saw bald eagles, loons, and many moose tracks.
This is how you can plan your version of our trip:
Where to stay: We got a nice waterfront campsite, for two nights at Molligwock state park. The price was good, and it’s short drive to Errol, N.H. Make reservations well in advance at nhstateparks.org. If you want to extend your stay or forgot something back home, stop into L.L. Cote the biggest store in Errol. They have everything from midge fly patterns to a .50 caliber rifle. If your hungry stop into the Hawgs Trawf and get a drink and a bite to eat if your tired of camp food and their one of the only places with wifi.
What to bring: I’d suggest bringing three rods: a #6 or heavier rod with sinking fly line, a #5 with floating fly line, and a light spinning outfit for fishing the deep holes.
A pair of chest waders is absolutely essential for making the most out of your trip. Giving you the chance to reach further out into the river and avoid the the high banks and trees.
I’d suggest bringing a box with your favorite nymph/wet fly patterns, some dry flys, and a couple streamers like the Autumn splendor. The two fish I caught were on a pink beadhead bugger my mother bought from L.L. Cote.
Here’s a gallery of photos from the trip and more will be coming soon. I hope others make a trip to the Androscoggin in the fall an unforgettable experience.

Franconia notch,

Franconia notch,

The early morning view from our campsite at Molligwock state park.

The early morning view from our campsite at Molligwock state park.

My mother casting,

My mother casting,

North country hot rod!!

North country hot rod!!

small rainbow trout on pink beadhead muddler,

Small rainbow trout on pink beadhead muddler,

Course fish weekend

This past weekend was some of the best fishing ever. On Saturday my mom and I packed our birding and fishing gear and headed over to Mud pond a local kayaking hotspot. Our plan was to paddle out to a duck blind at the far end birding along the way.
We we hoping for the rare sighting of a rail or bittern, but we ended up with eastern kingbirds, american tree sparrows, blackbirds and a couple small brown birds that we couldn’t identify . Still cool, I absolutely love kingbird flight pattern and we got to see babies.
When we got to the duck blind I got out and looked inside, it was built with a bench to sit two or three guys and camouflaged with branches and reeds.
As it started to drizzle we made are way back working the lily pads with our fishing lures. After a stretch brake half way back, we both switched to spinners and tossed them into the open spots between the reeds. My mom on her first cast almost landed a golden shiner. I lagged behind at this one large opening and caught a golden shiner and two yellow perch.

This is the first perch it was 10

On Sunday we drove to a relatives who has a house on the Contookook River, in Hopkinton, N.H. After all us grandkids took a group photo, I went down to the river. I started off using these small minnows I caught in a net as bait, but I couldn’t keep them in the hook so I ended up switching to a black and white Dardevale spoon. The first thing I caught was a big surprise, I pulled in a mussel, the hook went right between the shells, I ended up using it as sunfish bait. The next thing I caught was much more exiting I had let the spoon drift and was slowly realling it in when something big hit it, I was using a fairly light # 6-12 weight spin casting rod the rod was a bent into a perfect C. A flash of gold came and went I at first thought it was a smallmouth bass. But after screaming for a net I landed a gorgeous 16″, 1 1/2 pound fallfish ( Semitilus corporalis). My second biggest fish up to date.

image

I got the Suntech Krunei HM30 for my birthday back in April. I haven’t really gotten to use it, but over the last week I’ve had a blast trying it out.
On Wednesday I fished up at the boat launch on Harrisville pond and caught my first fish a small yellow perch. After a few more casts something hit hard, a 12+ inch chain pickerel. I didn’t have time to worry about my rod braking as the pickerel bent my rod into a perfect C. I almost had him when his teeth cut the line taking the fly with him.
Then today I went down to the local fire pond and the creek chubs started biting instantly. My second fish broke the 1 pound test line off the tip of my rod and took my tanago bobber and everything else with it.
I saw him swimming around, so I thought I might be able to grab the bobber if I had a boat. So I ran up to the house and called my grandpa to see if he would drive my jonboat down to the pond. He came over and loaded it into his truck and we drove down.
I didn’t end up getting my bobber back though I saw him swimming around well I continued fishing.
After the fish took my micro fishing set up I switched to elk hair caddis which turned out to be too big. so I switched to a pheasant feather dubbing damsel fly wet fly.
There was barely a cast where I didn’t have a fish on as I worked my way along the lily pads in the jon boat.
I was mostly catching creek chubs with The males with horny spines on there head.

Creek chub,

Creek chub ( Semotilus atromaculatus,)

 

Which where pretty good fighters on such a light rod.
I was casting at some ripples when some thing slammed the fly I thought it was another chub when a Golden shiner come over the side of the boat.

Golden shiner,

Golden shiner ( Notemigonus crysoleucas,)

The thing I like about fishing is you never no what your going to see. Today I found a eastern king bird nest with two eggs on a partialy submerged stump on the edge of the pond.
Then I saw three white tailed deer running along the power line corridor there summer coats shining in the sun reminding me of the impalas when I lived in Africa.

Ice fishing, sportsman pond, fiztwilliam, Nh,

On the 18th of January I went ice fishing on sportsman ponds, which is just south of Laurel lake in Fitzwilliam, Nh.
I drove out with the group by ATV, which was really fun.
When we got out there the guy who owned the bob house started heating it up. He also drilled some holes for tip ups, he set mine in a tear drop shape away from the bob house and he set his in a straight line.
We set up our tip up with the shiners hooked through the lip which was different from the first time I went when we hooked them through the back.
It was pretty windy out so our holes kept being filled up with snow which was really annoying.
The first fish I caught was a yellow perch,
The only other species of fish I caught was a black crappie ( Pomoxis nigromaculatus,) which I should have kept and fried up. (Yum),

First crappie

First crappie

There was a fish that made the flag go up and I kept trying to hook it because it kept striking the Shiner up to the hole,
The guy we where with caught an 8 lb largemouth bass, and a “lake snake” which is a chain pickerel.
I learned how to use the auger it was really fun it cut through the ice really quickly. image
When I had to go home at noon I didn’t want to leave I was having so much fun. The yell of FLAG, the slipping and sliding as you ran to a hole, and the fun of pulling a fish through the ice.