More photos from Columbus Day on the fly,

Here are some more photos from my trip. Tap on image if you want to make them larger.

Through Franconia notch,

Through Franconia notch,

Vegetable curry with cauliflower and rice!

Vegetable curry with cauliflower and rice!

night on the river,

night on the river,

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Morning espresso,

Morning espresso,

National outdoor leadership students white water canoeing,

National Outdoor Leadership students, white water canoeing,

Beautiful mushroom in blowdown conifer swamp,

Beautiful mushroom in blowdown conifer swamp,

Old Berlin ski jump no longer used,

Old Berlin ski jump no longer used,

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“Soon to be extinct”

I’m only fifteen so I’m still trying to figure out the political side of conservation so this entire post might be completely wrong, but remember I’m still trying to figure conservation politics out.

I’m going to go on what can be described as a rant, because something I read in “The Week” magazine really bothered me. It was a review on a book called ” Great Soul of Siberia” by Sooyong Park who spent 15 years filming a family of Amur tigers from an underground blind for months at a time. But here is the sentence in the review thatbothered me ” this soon to be extinct species. image
This phrase would make most people sad, but for some reason it bothered me, when I realized why. It made me feel like people are giving up on conservation. The Amur tiger is still critically endangered and needs our help, but its population has increased from less than 40 individuals in 1940 to more than 500 by 1980. image
Plus here’s some more statistics on the Amur leopard which lives in the same region. The Amur leopards population which was less than 30 in 2007 (when I first read about them,) has risen in the past eight years to more than 50 in 2015.
” Soon to be extinct” is a phrase that has no optimism for the future when I think we should be more than optimistic. Soon to be extinct doesn’t have to be.

Columbus Day on the fly,

For Columbus Day I went on my first fly fishing trip. My mom had the weekend off and my dad flew in the night before. The next day we headed north past the White Mountains, to the mighty Androscoggin River of northern New Hampshire.
The northern part of New Hampshire is absolutely gorgeous with large hills, cold rivers and vast forests. We saw bald eagles, loons, and many moose tracks.
This is how you can plan your version of our trip:
Where to stay: We got a nice waterfront campsite, for two nights at Molligwock state park. The price was good, and it’s short drive to Errol, N.H. Make reservations well in advance at nhstateparks.org. If you want to extend your stay or forgot something back home, stop into L.L. Cote the biggest store in Errol. They have everything from midge fly patterns to a .50 caliber rifle. If your hungry stop into the Hawgs Trawf and get a drink and a bite to eat if your tired of camp food and their one of the only places with wifi.
What to bring: I’d suggest bringing three rods: a #6 or heavier rod with sinking fly line, a #5 with floating fly line, and a light spinning outfit for fishing the deep holes.
A pair of chest waders is absolutely essential for making the most out of your trip. Giving you the chance to reach further out into the river and avoid the the high banks and trees.
I’d suggest bringing a box with your favorite nymph/wet fly patterns, some dry flys, and a couple streamers like the Autumn splendor. The two fish I caught were on a pink beadhead bugger my mother bought from L.L. Cote.
Here’s a gallery of photos from the trip and more will be coming soon. I hope others make a trip to the Androscoggin in the fall an unforgettable experience.

Franconia notch,

Franconia notch,

The early morning view from our campsite at Molligwock state park.

The early morning view from our campsite at Molligwock state park.

My mother casting,

My mother casting,

North country hot rod!!

North country hot rod!!

small rainbow trout on pink beadhead muddler,

Small rainbow trout on pink beadhead muddler,