Saltwater Taffy articulated streamer!

The Saltwater Taffy is an articulated streamer completely made of synthetic materials and is modeled and adapted from multiple articulated trout streamers and Striper patterns. I wanted a fly with a lot of movement, and with the translucency that a lot of saltwater flies are known for, so I present the Saltwater Taffy.
Ingredients:
1. Gamakatsu B10S stinger hook size 4 and 2,
2. 140-210 denier thread,
3. EP Brush Gamchange Blend,
4. EP Brush Foxy 1.5″ wide,
5. 6″- 8″ strong monofilament for loop, ( if you’re fishing for bluefish or pike,) skip the mono and make it wire,
6. E-Z Body Medium,
7. Egg Beads,

Start your thread midway on the stinger hook and wrap it toward the back.

Start your thread midway on the stinger hook and wrap it toward the back.

Tie on a four inch pinch of EP Gamechanger blend.

Tie on a four-inch pinch of EP Gamechange blend.

Fold the fibers that are facing forwards rearward making sure the fibers don't spin around the hook shank.

Fold the fibers that are facing forwards, rearward making sure the fibers don’t spin around the hook shank.

Tie on a full length of EP Brush Foxy, and start wrapping it forwards.

Tie on a full length of EP Brush Foxy, and wrap your thread to one eye length behind the hook eye, start wrapping the EP Foxy forwards.

Make sure to keep the fibers from getting trapped by brushing them backwards as you wrap.

Making sure to to keep the fibers from getting trapped by brushing them backwards as you wrap.

Finish wrapping the EP Bush Foxy, tie it off, and snip off the remainder. Whip finish the head and add head cement,

Finish wrapping the EP Bush Foxy, tie it off, and snip off the remainder. Whip finish the head and add head cement, put the stinger off to the side.

On the main hook create a thread base then tie on the monofilament adding ZAP GOO, to make it strong.

On the main hook create a thread base then tie on the monofilament, adding ZAP GOO to make it strong.

Thread onto the mono three egg beads.

Thread onto the mono three egg beads.

Now take your stinger, loop it on to the mono so the hook faces down, and thread the mono bake through the beads. Pull the mono until the stinger hook almost touches the beads. Then tie down the mono and snip the remainder.

Now take your stinger, loop it on to the mono so the hook faces down, and thread the mono back through the beads. Pull the mono until the stinger hook almost touches the beads. Then tie down the mono and snip the remainder off.

Tie on a six-inch pinch of EP Brush Gamechange Blend so that it is on all sides of the hook shank.

Tie on a six-inch pinch of EP Brush Gamechange Blend so that it is on all sides of the hook shank.

Tie in the remaking piece of EP Brush Foxy, wrap your thread halfway up the hook shank.

Tie on the remaining piece of EP Brush Foxy, wrap your thread halfway up the hook shank.

Wrap the EP Foxy to where the thread hand Gas then tie off.

Wrap the EP Foxy to where the thread hangs, then tie off.

Pull bake the EP Gamechager fibers bringing your thread in front of them creating a thread dam. Then put the EZ Body over the hook eye and tie it down, whip finish a head cement.

Pull bake the EP Gamechange fibers bringing your thread in front of them creating a thread dam. Then put the EZ Body over the hook eye and tie it down, whip finish, and head cement.

Push the EZ Body back so the end is behind the hook eye.

Push the EZ Body back, so the end is behind the hook eye.

Tie the end of the EZ Body down, whip finish, then very carefully us a cauterised tool to clean up around the head, be sure not to burn the thread.

Tie the end of the EZ Body down, whip finish, then very carefully us a cauterising tool to clean up around the head, be sure not to burn burn the thread.

Cover the EZ Body with SOFTEX, let it dry.

Cover the EZ Body with SOFTEX, let it dry.

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5 freshwater fly patterns I’m never without, Ever!

I always carry one or all of the following flies with me when I go fly fishing.

#1. Bead head Hares-Ear nymph; This would have to be my go to panfish fly. A sunny day, my five weight, and a box of nymphs, sound like a great day at the lake. From a boat I go to the up wind side of a weed bed and drift over it dropping the HE into open pockets in the weeds. This technique is similar to Czech nymphing in that the fly is directly underneath the tip of the rod.

#2. Pink Flash Bugger;  I’m not sure this flies real name, but my mom discovered it when on the fly fishing trip to Errol, NH last fall. It is now one of our most successful fly patterns. My mom fishes this fly 90 percent of the time, and has caught smallmouth bass, brook trout, and fallfish. img_0170

#3. Goddard Caddis; To be perfectly honest I’ve never been a big fan of dry flies. They get waterlogged, they get chewed into indistinguishable mush after a few fish. Plus most of what a fish eats is under the water’s surface. So I didn’t really give fishing dry flies a second thought until I discovered the Goddard Caddis.The first time I fished the Goddard, I lost track of the number of sunfish and chubs I caught. I even got my first double, a pumpkinseed on the Goddard and a yellow perch on a midge dropper. I fish a brown Goddard as a searching pattern, but I also tie tan and pink patterns. It makes a great strike indicator/top fly.

#4. Matuka; The Matuka is one of those flies that can be tied in many variations and is fun to mess with. Add an articulated shank with some monstrosity tied on, or tie on a pair of dumbbell eyes giving the Matuka a nice jigging motion. I prefer to tie my Matukas in olive with a gold rib. Trolling them for smallmouth bass has worked great, and the trout seem to like them, but can’t get their mouth around the #2 hook I’ve been using!

#5. Sakasa Kebari; When I first got started fly fishing I used a Suntech Kurenai hm30 to swing Sakasa Kebari’s for brook trout and chubs on local streams. The Sakasa Kebari is a great fly for small infertile streams, where most of the food the fish is eating is free-floating in the current.

“Soon to be extinct”

I’m only fifteen so I’m still trying to figure out the political side of conservation so this entire post might be completely wrong, but remember I’m still trying to figure conservation politics out.

I’m going to go on what can be described as a rant, because something I read in “The Week” magazine really bothered me. It was a review on a book called ” Great Soul of Siberia” by Sooyong Park who spent 15 years filming a family of Amur tigers from an underground blind for months at a time. But here is the sentence in the review thatbothered me ” this soon to be extinct species. image
This phrase would make most people sad, but for some reason it bothered me, when I realized why. It made me feel like people are giving up on conservation. The Amur tiger is still critically endangered and needs our help, but its population has increased from less than 40 individuals in 1940 to more than 500 by 1980. image
Plus here’s some more statistics on the Amur leopard which lives in the same region. The Amur leopards population which was less than 30 in 2007 (when I first read about them,) has risen in the past eight years to more than 50 in 2015.
” Soon to be extinct” is a phrase that has no optimism for the future when I think we should be more than optimistic. Soon to be extinct doesn’t have to be.

Columbus Day on the fly,

For Columbus Day I went on my first fly fishing trip. My mom had the weekend off and my dad flew in the night before. The next day we headed north past the White Mountains, to the mighty Androscoggin River of northern New Hampshire.
The northern part of New Hampshire is absolutely gorgeous with large hills, cold rivers and vast forests. We saw bald eagles, loons, and many moose tracks.
This is how you can plan your version of our trip:
Where to stay: We got a nice waterfront campsite, for two nights at Molligwock state park. The price was good, and it’s short drive to Errol, N.H. Make reservations well in advance at nhstateparks.org. If you want to extend your stay or forgot something back home, stop into L.L. Cote the biggest store in Errol. They have everything from midge fly patterns to a .50 caliber rifle. If your hungry stop into the Hawgs Trawf and get a drink and a bite to eat if your tired of camp food and their one of the only places with wifi.
What to bring: I’d suggest bringing three rods: a #6 or heavier rod with sinking fly line, a #5 with floating fly line, and a light spinning outfit for fishing the deep holes.
A pair of chest waders is absolutely essential for making the most out of your trip. Giving you the chance to reach further out into the river and avoid the the high banks and trees.
I’d suggest bringing a box with your favorite nymph/wet fly patterns, some dry flys, and a couple streamers like the Autumn splendor. The two fish I caught were on a pink beadhead bugger my mother bought from L.L. Cote.
Here’s a gallery of photos from the trip and more will be coming soon. I hope others make a trip to the Androscoggin in the fall an unforgettable experience.

Franconia notch,

Franconia notch,

The early morning view from our campsite at Molligwock state park.

The early morning view from our campsite at Molligwock state park.

My mother casting,

My mother casting,

North country hot rod!!

North country hot rod!!

small rainbow trout on pink beadhead muddler,

Small rainbow trout on pink beadhead muddler,

New Hampshires most succesful native,

New Hampshire is a land of water, it borders the Atlantic Ocean and has hundreds of ponds and river. With so much water you would expect lots of fish To be swimming around in them, which there is, but you would probably be surprised to find out that your favorite sports fish might not be native.
Before Europeans started to settle NH the states was home to a handful of chars, whitefish, pickerel and perch. Plus anadromous species like sturgeon, striped bass and eel’s. After the colonists settled in, they started introducing nonnative species like black bass, northern pike, and bluegills. The introduced them for there sporting needs or by accident.
There’s a native that has seen it all. The Bullhead ( Ameriurus nebulosus,) or hornpout. Is very abundant, living in polluted rivers or crystal clear lakes. The reach a maximum length of 21 inches and can survive oxygen lows that would make any fish other than a carp or snakehead ( both invasive) suffocate. My moms friend, my fake aunt has had them stay alive in the freezer overnight. People fish for them at night using worms or chicken livers.
I don’t fish for bullheads, but when I saw some in the pond at my house I had to catch some so I baited a minnow pot with cheese. I ended up catching a bunch of them most averaging at six inches. They made grunting squeaky noises when I pulled them from the water, it is very interesting to hear a fish vocalise. There barbs are very sharp and caught in the mesh of the trap so I had to carefully remove them.
I you hope enjoyed my blog post it’s not anything you can’t find out somewhere else but I had fun writing it.
If anybody who reads my blog has some friendly tips on writing they can post there thought in comments.

Elderflower fritters,

Today well reading the “Poachers cookbook,” by Prue Coats, I decided I would try my hands at making some elderflower fritters for the first time. So when my mom picked me up from my grandmothers we drove to some places where they where blooming and picked the flower heads, then we stopped off at the general store for some flour. When we got home I fallowed the recipe and came out with the most amazing fritters I had ever eaten. I hope you enjoy this recipe as much as I did.

Ingredients:
1. 8-12 elderflower heads,
2. 4 oz (125g) multipurpose flour,
3. 2 eggs,
4. 1/4 pint (150ml) milk,
5. 1 tablespoon (15ml) sunflower oil,
6. Sunflower oil for frying,
7. Caster sugar,
8. 1 lemon

Mix the flour, eggs, milk, and oil in bowl until there are no clumps and the batter is thick. Pour oil into wok and let it heat up on medium high. When the oil sizzles when you sprinkle water in it, dip the flowers heads in the batter then put the heads ( use the stems as handles,) in the oil until puffy and crisp. Dust with caster sugar and serve with lemon quarters. You can eat every part of it.
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Course fish weekend

This past weekend was some of the best fishing ever. On Saturday my mom and I packed our birding and fishing gear and headed over to Mud pond a local kayaking hotspot. Our plan was to paddle out to a duck blind at the far end birding along the way.
We we hoping for the rare sighting of a rail or bittern, but we ended up with eastern kingbirds, american tree sparrows, blackbirds and a couple small brown birds that we couldn’t identify . Still cool, I absolutely love kingbird flight pattern and we got to see babies.
When we got to the duck blind I got out and looked inside, it was built with a bench to sit two or three guys and camouflaged with branches and reeds.
As it started to drizzle we made are way back working the lily pads with our fishing lures. After a stretch brake half way back, we both switched to spinners and tossed them into the open spots between the reeds. My mom on her first cast almost landed a golden shiner. I lagged behind at this one large opening and caught a golden shiner and two yellow perch.

This is the first perch it was 10

On Sunday we drove to a relatives who has a house on the Contookook River, in Hopkinton, N.H. After all us grandkids took a group photo, I went down to the river. I started off using these small minnows I caught in a net as bait, but I couldn’t keep them in the hook so I ended up switching to a black and white Dardevale spoon. The first thing I caught was a big surprise, I pulled in a mussel, the hook went right between the shells, I ended up using it as sunfish bait. The next thing I caught was much more exiting I had let the spoon drift and was slowly realling it in when something big hit it, I was using a fairly light # 6-12 weight spin casting rod the rod was a bent into a perfect C. A flash of gold came and went I at first thought it was a smallmouth bass. But after screaming for a net I landed a gorgeous 16″, 1 1/2 pound fallfish ( Semitilus corporalis). My second biggest fish up to date.

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My Sharona,

Well brushing my dog I was able to get a lot of really nice fur perfect for dubbing so I went to my fly tying desk and tied up a small group of flies based on some grayling and euronymphing fly patterns and one of our local caddis flies, I’ve named it the fly “My Sharona”.
It is tied on a size # 16 umpqua nymph hook, using hot pink thread, white dog hair dubbed body, peacock herl collar, and an optional bead head.
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Slide on beadhead, start the thread midshank and wrap backwards then wrap forward two eye lengths. Wrap on dubbing leaving a gap in between dubbing and beadhead. Tie in peacock herl and wrap a thick collar behind the beadhead, whip finish.
If you choose to tie it without beadhead fly will float then slowly sink.
I also tie a diving caddis version with a pheasant feather collar.